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Thread: T5 Swap-well worth it

  1. #11
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    I've got solid rubber pads in the factory mount brackets. Been fine for 10 years.
    '88 Thunderbird LX: 306, Edelbrock Performer heads, Comp 266HR cam, Edelbrock Performer RPM intake, Edelbrock 70mm TB, 76mm C&L MAF, 30lb injectors, 2.5" exhaust, AOD with 2800 PI converter, 8.8 with 3.73 gears, 31 spline Traction-Lok, 31 spline Moser axles, 04 Cobra front arms, Maximum Motorsports extreme duty rear arms, subframes.
    '11 Focus, '12 Mustang 3.7, '17 Accord EX-L V6

  2. #12
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    Right now, we only have one vendor making mounts for our cars, assuming you're still using the factory k-member.

    https://tbirdcougarparts.com

    I have the prototype 2.3L mounts on my car and they work well so far.
    It's Gumby's fault.

  3. #13
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    Ah the ones I pulled out were solid rubber and the ones I put in were also solid rubber

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonmount View Post
    Ah the ones I pulled out were solid rubber and the ones I put in were also solid rubber
    All aftermarket mounts are solid rubber I think as a cheaper solution.
    One 88

  5. #15
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    Those are the ones I kept tearing apart. I even tried to glue them back together
    Quote Originally Posted by jcassity
    I honestly dont think you could exceed the cost of a new car buy installing new *stock* parts everywhere in your coug our tbird. Its just plain impossible. You could revamp the entire drivetrain/engine/suspenstion and still come out ahead.
    Hooligans!
    1988 Crown Vic wagon. 120K California car. Wifes grocery getter. (junked)
    1987 Ford Thunderbird LX. 5.0. s.o., sn-95 t-5 and an f-150 clutch. Driven daily and going strong.
    1986 cougar.
    lilsammywasapunkrocker@yahoo.com

  6. #16
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    Well, I don't think motor mounts are something you can exactly glue
    It's Gumby's fault.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tbird232ci View Post
    Right now, we only have one vendor making mounts for our cars, assuming you're still using the factory k-member.

    https://tbirdcougarparts.com

    I have the prototype 2.3L mounts on my car and they work well so far.
    In my absence I'm finding out that Chuck no longer makes mounts but there is this guy. Did he come up with his own design or is this Chucks?
    One 88

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tbird232ci View Post
    Well, I don't think motor mounts are something you can exactly glue
    Civic guys used to make mounts solid using windshield adhesive, which just so happens to be the same thing most motor mounts are made out if. The "solid" rubber mounts are actually molded in two pieces and glued together without anything else actually holding them together except some sort of epoxy or glue, which is why they come apart and fail. I correctly assumed it wouldn't work, but I had new motor mounts on order, and I already had the glue.

    I've also drilled straight through the motor mount and tried bolting them together, which just creates a weak point in the rubber, then it just tears straight through the rubber. I've also used "universal" body and motor mounts to try to make my own.

    Pretty much given up on keeping the stock design together, and that is with stock high mile power levels.

    Next I think I am litterly gonna do a motor plate and also build some real solid motor mounts with angle iron.
    Quote Originally Posted by jcassity
    I honestly dont think you could exceed the cost of a new car buy installing new *stock* parts everywhere in your coug our tbird. Its just plain impossible. You could revamp the entire drivetrain/engine/suspenstion and still come out ahead.
    Hooligans!
    1988 Crown Vic wagon. 120K California car. Wifes grocery getter. (junked)
    1987 Ford Thunderbird LX. 5.0. s.o., sn-95 t-5 and an f-150 clutch. Driven daily and going strong.
    1986 cougar.
    lilsammywasapunkrocker@yahoo.com

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CougarSE View Post
    In my absence I'm finding out that Chuck no longer makes mounts but there is this guy. Did he come up with his own design or is this Chucks?
    They are Heaths own designs. They do resemble Chucks, but I think that's mostly because that's the most simple and cost effective way to make them. I haven't had any issues with my 2.3L mounts, but I also don't drive the car that often nor do I make much more power than stock right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Haystack View Post
    Civic guys used to make mounts solid using windshield adhesive, which just so happens to be the same thing most motor mounts are made out if. The "solid" rubber mounts are actually molded in two pieces and glued together without anything else actually holding them together except some sort of epoxy or glue, which is why they come apart and fail. I correctly assumed it wouldn't work, but I had new motor mounts on order, and I already had the glue.

    I've also drilled straight through the motor mount and tried bolting them together, which just creates a weak point in the rubber, then it just tears straight through the rubber. I've also used "universal" body and motor mounts to try to make my own.

    Pretty much given up on keeping the stock design together, and that is with stock high mile power levels.

    Next I think I am litterly gonna do a motor plate and also build some real solid motor mounts with angle iron.
    I've done that with one of my old Turbo Dodges. You're just filling in the open areas in the mounts with the windshield urethane rather than making or gluing a full mount together.

    Grab a set of the mounts from the link I posted above. Their 5.0 mounts are likely overkill for most people here. I think he made them out of 1/2" plate or something similar.
    It's Gumby's fault.

  10. #20
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    Yup, the srock replacement mounts actually have a metal plate with holes in it that the rubber is molded to. I tried drilling out where the rubber failed and refilling it with all kinds of things to hold them together.

    One day when I have some money I'll pick up some nice ones. I really do want to build my own mounts one day also
    Quote Originally Posted by jcassity
    I honestly dont think you could exceed the cost of a new car buy installing new *stock* parts everywhere in your coug our tbird. Its just plain impossible. You could revamp the entire drivetrain/engine/suspenstion and still come out ahead.
    Hooligans!
    1988 Crown Vic wagon. 120K California car. Wifes grocery getter. (junked)
    1987 Ford Thunderbird LX. 5.0. s.o., sn-95 t-5 and an f-150 clutch. Driven daily and going strong.
    1986 cougar.
    lilsammywasapunkrocker@yahoo.com

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