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Thread: '70 F100 Short Bed Styleside

  1. #31
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    Oct 2006
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    Yeah, completely aware of my disc brake choice with regards to wheel selection. Most likely running 20’s but may run 18’s up front but will definitely be 20’s in the rear.

  2. #32
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    Jun 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aerocoupe View Post
    I loaded it up this morning and am going to run it over to the powder coater after work. The aluminum is really porous and it is going to stain again with just general road grim let alone any kind of fluid leak so the more I thought about it over the last week the more I was leaning towards a clear powder coat.
    Probably the best bet, especially if you want the bare aluminum look. It'll be impossible to keep it looking that nice without the clear overcoat.
    '88 Thunderbird LX: 306, Edelbrock Performer heads, Comp 266HR cam, Edelbrock Performer RPM intake, Edelbrock 70mm TB, 76mm C&L MAF, 30lb injectors, 2.5" exhaust, AOD with 2800 PI converter, 8.8 with 3.73 gears, 31 spline Traction-Lok, 31 spline Moser axles, 04 Cobra front arms, Maximum Motorsports extreme duty rear arms, subframes.
    '11 Focus, '12 Mustang 3.7, '17 Accord EX-L V6

  3. #33
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    Oct 2006
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    So the next step was to either order spacer tubes new or see if I could salvage the ones I had in the chunks of frame rail they left with the IFS. I looked on line and the tubes new were $28 each plus shipping so for $112+ I figured it was worth a shot to salvage them. The spacers/tubes I am talking about are P/N 3W1Z-5D096-AA and look like this:



    When in stalled in the F100 frame they look like this (screen shot from TexasKnowhow's YouTube channel):



    I have seen some use tubing which does work I like the idea of using of the factory spacer (description on Ford packaging and again from TexasKnowhow's channel). Here is a picture of the packaging as I had no idea if it was a sleeve, tube, spacer or what.



    So after laying the CV frame rail piece on the garage floor I decided to build a jig of some sort to hold it so I could use both hands to cut the spacers out. Knocked that out in about 30 min (most of the time was looking for scrap wood and screws). Next was locating the box of hole saws and charging the batteries up on the cordless. Ended up using a 1-3/4" hole saw, cordless drill, and some cutting fluid. I removed the pilot bit so not to damage the threads in the spacer which was no issue as the hole saw just fits over the spacer. Here are some pics of the work and it took about 30 minutes. The "jig" I built out of scrap wood I had laying around the garage. This held the CV frame rail so I could use both hands to cut the spacers out with the hole saw and cordless drill. I just put a bit of cutting fluid on the frame rail and after it had cut a groove in the frame rail I just used that to hold the cutting fluid from there on out. I took four more rounds of cutting fluid after the initial one to get them out. I went slow and let the hole saw work.

    CV Frame Rail in "Jig" with One Spacer Already Removed (was alot easier than I thought)


    Cordless and Hole Saw


    Cutting Spacer from CV Frame Rail


    Spacer Removed from CV Frame Rail


    CV Frame Rail with Both Spacers Removed


    All Four Spacers after Removal


    So all that is left to do is remove the remaining frame rail material from the spacer. It was welded to the frame rail with two 1/2" long welds on oppsote sides of the spacer so I am going to concentrate on grinding off the welds first to see of the rest just falls off after that.

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