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Thread: O2 sensor bung

  1. #1
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    Default O2 sensor bung

    rock auto has two size injector bungs or injector "nuts" shown.

    which one (qty2) do i buy?

    this will allow me to screw in my 02 sensors to my exhaust i have yet to hand build.

    i have a bunch on room on my header near the flange and i am considering putting the bungs on the headers so they are easy to remove later.

  2. #2
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    You will want to install the O2 bungs on the collectors of the header and preferably at or above the 9:00 to 3:00 positions. You will also want to run a ceramic coated header to trap the heat as this is critical to the O2 sensor. The sensor needs heat to function properly but too close to the cylinder head will cause it to be too hot and run lean and too far away and it will run cold and run too rich. Most header companies put the bung in the collector and from what I remember most reported that the ceramic units performed better. The car will idle a little rough on initial start up but should clean up and on really cold days it will take a little longer to clean up. If you have a tuner you can adjust this out in the timing tables.

    Correct thread pitch for the O2 sensors is 18mm x 1.5.

  3. #3
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    The EEC-IV, for a 5.0 Mustang, expects the sensors to be in the pipe just past the shorty header collector. I'd put it in the same place.
    '88 Thunderbird LX: 306, Edelbrock Performer heads, Comp 266HR cam, Edelbrock Performer RPM intake, Edelbrock 70mm TB, 76mm C&L MAF, 30lb injectors, 2.5" exhaust, AOD with 2800 PI converter, 8.8 with 3.73 gears, 31 spline Traction-Lok, 31 spline Moser axles, 04 Cobra front arms, Maximum Motorsports extreme duty rear arms, subframes.
    '11 Focus, '12 Mustang 3.7, '17 Accord EX-L V6

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    Not possible with long tubes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aerocoupe View Post
    Not possible with long tubes.
    I thought he was running shorty headers?
    '88 Thunderbird LX: 306, Edelbrock Performer heads, Comp 266HR cam, Edelbrock Performer RPM intake, Edelbrock 70mm TB, 76mm C&L MAF, 30lb injectors, 2.5" exhaust, AOD with 2800 PI converter, 8.8 with 3.73 gears, 31 spline Traction-Lok, 31 spline Moser axles, 04 Cobra front arms, Maximum Motorsports extreme duty rear arms, subframes.
    '11 Focus, '12 Mustang 3.7, '17 Accord EX-L V6

  6. #6
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    Yup my mistake there no mention of LT’s. Was reading one of Vinny’s posts and crossed them up.

    If using shorties the O2 sensors go in the pipe just down stream of the fire cone connections. Quick google search will show you where.

  7. #7
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    yes, running stainless shorty headers.

    not to say i know anything here but i did some self paced vid watching early today.
    apparently,, i need to have the o2's located where i can get a min of 600degF before the o2's start making voltage.

    for obd2, the o2 is the backbone of the eeciv system,, yet if i dont get the maf correct,, the o2 placement is up in the air.

    i got to thinking,, which can be something i get carried away with but...

    would'nt it be cool if the physical location of the o2 sensor was adjustable?

    meaning its home can be calibrated.

    im thinking a slot cut long ways on your pipe.
    the o2 mounts to a plate that then the plate mounts to the slot cut out in your exhaust.
    the mounting would be something simple like stainless clamps... then you can slide the 02 upstream or downstream to achieve the optimum voltage,, of what i think is around a half volt???????
    a gasket for high temps like asbestos or something would be need to seal it off.

    just thinking out things, ,, i know its prob a stupid idea but being as the o2 has so much power in the eec fuel strategy,, it really seems like its placement can make or break you,, so why not make it something you can calibrate.?? instead of being a stationary thorn in your side because you put it in an area thats too cool or too hot.

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    For the most accurate O2 sensors, go with the 4 wire ones.
    Get away from using the sensor threads as the ground side of the sensor and have copper wire all the way back to the EEC.

  9. #9
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    The o2s (hego) for your car are heated, that's why there are 4 wires. They should still be close to the collector to minimize latency between combustion and measurement, but being heated, they aren't vulnerable to deficiency in exhaust temp affecting the time it takes them to warmup and start reading.
    1988 Thunderbird 5.0
    GT40P, TFS-1, KB domes, 30#, MAF conversion, Explorer GT40 Upper/Lower, Smog delete, Wide Ratio AOD Mod, Unlocked Speedo, 3G Charging System Upgrade, Hi-Torque Mini Starter, 3.73 LSD, BBK 1 5/8 unequal headers, H-Pipe.

    88 Thunderbird/Cougar EVTM
    (Thanks to Trinom for hosting)

  10. #10
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    Actually.....3 and 4 wire are both heated. The 4th wire is a dedicated signal return instead of the orange wire at the back of the intake.

    John

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