Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26

Thread: The "HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF" thread

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Toledo Ohio
    Posts
    2,719
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default Re: The "HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF" thread

    Not to be an ass but adaware pales in comparsion to Spysweeper

    www.webroot.com

    Check it out i thought that adaware was all the world till i found this

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Seward, NE
    Posts
    87
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default Re: The "HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF" thread

    I agree with you but unless spysweeper has changed it also installs spyware on your computer. Several years ago it was deemed unsafe by some big consortium. I can't remember the details now since it was about 2 years ago or more. They may have reinvented themselves since. I just stay away to be safe.

    From my experience there is however no be all cure all program. It takes a group of programs to fix spyware. Each does a better job at certain things than the other including spysweeper.

    tc
    1986 Mercury Cougar -- Midnight Wine and Taupe ($1700) in 1999 w/ 103,000 miles. Now with a motor from an 87 with 54K on it.
    1988 Mercury Cougar -- Light Sandlewood Metalic ($40) in 2003 with 111,000 miles. Needs a fender, some welding and a good tune up. Possibly my next daily if i ever get it to the shop.
    1991 GMC Sonoma, My $50 daily driver.


  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Middle Sackville, NS, CANADA
    Posts
    9,826
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)

    Default Re: The "HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF" thread

    Lately it seems that the scammers are getting more sophisticated. They now know that nobody will fall for their "your account has been suspended" scam, so they have resorted to spoofing other way using ebay/ PayPal. I recently received one saying that ebay cancelled all of my auctions and to "click here" to get them reinstated, but I didn't take a screenshot. I got one today saying that somebody paid for my item but didn't receive it, but of course the "click here to respond" button takes you to some website in Korea that apes Ebay's login page.
    Once again, it is EXTREMELY important to recognise these emails as fakes, and the easiest way to do so is by remembering a few simple guidelines:

    1) Ebay/paypal will never send an email that starts out as "Dear Ebay member" or "Dear PayPal member" or even "Dear xxx@xxx.com" - if you really do have an account they will identify you by your first and last name, not your email address or "Ebay member"

    2) If there is a problem with an auction or a transaction the email will identify that transaction using both the item number AND the item title. This is a tricky one because the false one I had about my auctions being cancelled gave a fake number. It didn't name the item being sold in the auction though, which was a warning.

    3) Hover your mouse over any links in the email and down in the lower left corner youll see where that link takes you. The scammers are getting tricky here too, by using subdomains, so you might see "www.ebay.com.875987/ebaylogin/new/login.php or something like that. The real domain name you're going to is the "875987", not ebay.com. Remember, EVERYTHING before the first forward slash (/) in the address is the domain you're going to.

    A screenshot of today's fraud:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    2015 Mustang GT Premium - 5.0, 6-speed, Guard Green - too much awesome for one car

    1988 5.0 Thunderbird SOLD SEPT 11 2010: TC front clip/hood ♣ Body & paint completed Oct 2007 ♣ 3.55 TC rear end and front brakes ♣ TC interior ♣ CHE rear control arms (adjustable lowers) ♣ 2001 Bullitt springs ♣ Energy suspension poly busings ♣ Kenne Brown subframe connectors ♣ CWE engine mounts ♣ Thundercat sequential turn signals ♣ Explorer overhead console (temp/compass display) ♣ 2.25" off-road dual exhaust ♣ T-5 transmission swap completed Jan 2009 ♣

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    6,086
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)

    Default Re: The "HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF" thread

    Ouch....sorry to hear about that Carm. At least no damage was done. You can thank the W3C for allowing Unicode to become an acceptable standard. Unicode looks like that gibberish but most all newer browsers will translate said gibberish into what looks like a legitimate site. So "www.2f8ng8vns.com" could be translated easily into "www.paypal.com". Lovely, isn't it? They're keeping us web guys on our toes.

    I've found that if you turn off HTML e-mail, finding spam is much, much easier. Legitimate eBay or Paypal e-mail will come across easily as plain text that way. Anything spoofing either one (or anything else) will show up as HTML code, which is a dead giveaway that it's spam.

    Also, when you open a piece of mail in HTML and you are online, the graphics embedded in that e-mail will start calling to their host to fill in. That call out will tell the host, "Hey, someone at this address is requesting graphics!" Which then affirms to the host that the address is legitimate, therefore setting you up for more spam in the future. Turning off HTML e-mail will not call for those graphics. You'll lose all the pretty graphics from legitimate e-mails, but that's a small price to pay when it comes to your security and privacy.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Middle Sackville, NS, CANADA
    Posts
    9,826
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)

    Default Re: The "HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF" thread

    Eric - you don't have to be sorry for me - I didn't fall for it. I'm much too paranoid to ever fall for one of those scams. If anything looks even the slightest bit suspicious I immediately forward it to spoof@paypal.com or spoof@ebay.com...

    You make good points about images. Outlook Express (yes, i still use it) has a function that blocks all images embedded within the email while still allowing the HTML formatting to come through. In the later versions this is turned on by default, with a header at the top of the email saying "Outlook Express has blocked some of the images embedded within your email in order to prevent the sender from identifying your computer. Click here to download those images". It is a wise decision to leave that feature enabled.

    Most of those scammer emails actually use images on payPal and eBay's servers and just link to them. Whether they do thiis to conserve their own bandwidth or to make the emails look more legit I dunno...
    2015 Mustang GT Premium - 5.0, 6-speed, Guard Green - too much awesome for one car

    1988 5.0 Thunderbird SOLD SEPT 11 2010: TC front clip/hood ♣ Body & paint completed Oct 2007 ♣ 3.55 TC rear end and front brakes ♣ TC interior ♣ CHE rear control arms (adjustable lowers) ♣ 2001 Bullitt springs ♣ Energy suspension poly busings ♣ Kenne Brown subframe connectors ♣ CWE engine mounts ♣ Thundercat sequential turn signals ♣ Explorer overhead console (temp/compass display) ♣ 2.25" off-road dual exhaust ♣ T-5 transmission swap completed Jan 2009 ♣

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Clarkston, MI
    Posts
    89
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    I am going to add a few things here, and some are just a refresh. (I know it is a year after the last post)

    I have found the following to work very well:

    1) AdAware with both messenger plug-ins set to blocked/disabled.

    2) Spy Bot (immunization enabled)

    3) Spyware Blaster (with all blocks enabled - works w/ Fire Fox too)

    4) Spyware Guard - keeps your browser from being hijacked: as in changes in home page, search page, etc. (BHO - Browser Help Objects)

    5) Keeping Windows updated (ofcourse)

    6) Plain text e-mail ONLY!

    7) Do not hide known file extensions (you would be supprised at what scanning software can miss when the extensions are hidden)

    8) Show all files & folders

    9) A good AV program (ofcourse)

    10) Ditch Windows Defender, it is a resource hogg. Use only in case of emergency then un-install!

    12) Go to www.grc.com and test your ports! You might be supprised at the results (especially if you are using AOL).

    13) Use Fire-Fox! AND use a pop-up blocker too!

    14) Ditch Outlook Express. Use the corporate version of Outlook or some other program like Thunderbird.

    15) Put your kids on a restricted diet. WinXP and 2K will allow you to set their login account to "Restricted". This means that much of the stuff that trys to install itself will fail, even if your kid clicks "ok".

    16) Close those pesky pop-ups that do get through using the "Task Manager". More often than not, cancel = ok, and no = yes. The "x" icon to close the pop-up can even be used to trigger a silent install.

    17) TC's excellent advice on e-mails and fishing

    18) HijackThis for the advanced users. If you have no experience working with the registry, or have experience but are not comfortable in there, find someone who is!

    In addition:

    1) If you are on DSL/Cable and are not using either a router w/ hardware firewall or a stand alone hardware firewall, get one or get off the net!

    2) Get a good software firewall. Zone Alarm is good for noobs. For the more advanced user, grab Agnitum Outpost Firewall Pro (Novell uses the core code as the base for their Enterprise Level "Border Manager" product).

    3) Use your Junk Mail Filter!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Middle Sackville, NS, CANADA
    Posts
    9,826
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)

    Default

    Seeing as this thread's been revived I'll add a new, sinister one as well: "Vishing". Vishing is similarto "phishing", except that instead of emails the fraudsters will call you on your telehpone and pose as your bank. They may even leave a message with a phone number to call back (more on that below). DO NOT TALK TO THESE PEOPLE, and DO NOT CALL THESE NUMBERS BACK!!!

    If a person calls you claiming to be your bank, say "OK, I'll call you back at the bank". Ask for a case/reference number and call the bank's number (found on the back of your bank or credit card, on their real website, or in the phone book). Do NOT call any number the person that calls you gives you!!!! These people WILL give you a fake phone number, so take the time to look up the number yourself! If the person that has called you protests when you tell them that you want to call them back, explain that you are doing so to prevent fraud, and then hang up. Your bank will understand why you want to call them back (in fact, banks encourage this to prevent vishing).

    Now, about those messages they may leave: Fraudsters have gotten sophisticated to the point that they will actually mimic your bank's voice prompt system. If you call the number provided by the scammer you will be connected to a machine that asks for your bank card number and telephone PIN number for verification (just like your real bank does). These phony voice prompt systems can be VERY authentic appearing, so there is only ONE way to avoid the scam: Never, EVER, call a phone number provided in a recorded message, email or even by a live person. ONLY CALL THE PHONE NUMBER ON YOUR BANK CARD OR IN THE PHONE BOOK!!! ONLY deal with the bank through a phone call that YOU placed, not one that they placed to you. The scammers use VoIP phone systems that allow them to set up a phone number with any area code, and even a number similar to your bank's (with a digit or two flipped). This means that they could set up a number in New York but actually be in Malaysia. The red text above explains the only reliable way to prevent getting nailed by this type of fraud.

    Oh, and as an aside: This should be common sense, but NEVER enter personal info (bank/credit card numbers, social security numbers, etc) over any kind of wireless phone (including cordless and cell). Those signals can be intercepted, especially cordless phones, and the person intercepting them can then assume your identity. If you're going to call your bank, always do so from a hard wired phone.
    2015 Mustang GT Premium - 5.0, 6-speed, Guard Green - too much awesome for one car

    1988 5.0 Thunderbird SOLD SEPT 11 2010: TC front clip/hood ♣ Body & paint completed Oct 2007 ♣ 3.55 TC rear end and front brakes ♣ TC interior ♣ CHE rear control arms (adjustable lowers) ♣ 2001 Bullitt springs ♣ Energy suspension poly busings ♣ Kenne Brown subframe connectors ♣ CWE engine mounts ♣ Thundercat sequential turn signals ♣ Explorer overhead console (temp/compass display) ♣ 2.25" off-road dual exhaust ♣ T-5 transmission swap completed Jan 2009 ♣

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    339
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Thunder Chicken, there is also a reason Microsoft hides certain files and extension. To prevent noobs from deleting any file they see..but good tips for people not knowing how to keep themself clean. I personally use Adaware, Firefox and AVG. Don't forget..keep your cookies clean! There are tons of freeware out there to do this. I prefer Ccleaner or cleanup.exe!!
    1987 Ford Thunderbird Turbo Coupe

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Middle Sackville, NS, CANADA
    Posts
    9,826
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)

    Default

    I use ccleaner myself. As for hiding files - although I set my computer to show OS files, I don't recommend it for noobs that think Windows Explorer and Internet Explorer are the same thing. I do recommend "unhiding" file extensions though, because a noob is the one that needs to know that "jennifersboobs.jpg.pif" is not a picture.
    2015 Mustang GT Premium - 5.0, 6-speed, Guard Green - too much awesome for one car

    1988 5.0 Thunderbird SOLD SEPT 11 2010: TC front clip/hood ♣ Body & paint completed Oct 2007 ♣ 3.55 TC rear end and front brakes ♣ TC interior ♣ CHE rear control arms (adjustable lowers) ♣ 2001 Bullitt springs ♣ Energy suspension poly busings ♣ Kenne Brown subframe connectors ♣ CWE engine mounts ♣ Thundercat sequential turn signals ♣ Explorer overhead console (temp/compass display) ♣ 2.25" off-road dual exhaust ♣ T-5 transmission swap completed Jan 2009 ♣

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    339
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    TC, I agree with you there, but how much do you think noobs pay attention to when opening a file with such a promising title name?!!?! Most noobs don't even know that .bmp or .jpg are picture files!!!
    1987 Ford Thunderbird Turbo Coupe

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •